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Blog Posts in March 2017

NETCONF on Cisco Campus Switches on Software Gone Wild

During Cisco Live Europe (huge thanks to Tech Field Day crew for bringing me there) I had a chat with Jeff McLaughlin about NETCONF support on Cisco IOS XE, in particular on the campus switches.

We started with the obvious question “why would someone want to have NETCONF on a campus switch”, continued with “why would you use NETCONF and not REST API”, and diverted into “who loves regular expressions”. Teasing aside, we discussed:

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Railroads and Cars: a Fairy Tale

Imagine a Flatworld in which railways are the main means of transportation. They were using horses and pigeons in the past, and experimenting with underwater airplanes, but railways won because they were cheaper than anything else (for whatever reason, price always wins over quality or convenience in that world).

As always, there were multiple railroad tracks and trains manufacturers, and everyone tried to use all sorts of interesting tricks to force the customers to buy tracks and trains from the same vendor. Different track gauges and heptagonal wheels that worked best with grooved rails were the usual tricks.

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Update: Virtual Switches in vSphere Environment

Just FYI: a week after I wrote this (don't forget to go through the comments), VMware made it official:

…we’ve found that VMware’s native virtual switch implementation has become the de facto standard for greater than 99% of vSphere customers today. … Moving forward, VMware will have a single virtual switch strategy that focuses on two sets of native virtual switch offerings – VMware vSphere® Standard Switch and vSphere Distributed Switch™ for VMware vSphere, and the Open virtual switch (OVS).
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Updated: User Authentication in Ansible Network Modules

Ansible network modules (at least in the way they’re implemented in Ansible releases 2.1 and 2.2) were one of the more confusing aspects of my Building Network Automation Solutions online course (and based on what I’m seeing on various chat sites we weren’t the only ones).

I wrote an in-depth explanation of how you’re supposed to be using them a while ago and now updated it with user authentication information.

Why Didn’t We Have Leaf-and-Spine Fabrics a Decade Ago?

One of my readers watched my Leaf-and-Spine Fabric Architectures webinar and had a follow-up question:

You mentioned 3-tier architecture was dictated primarily by port count and throughput limits. I can understand that port density was a problem, but can you elaborate why the throughput is also a limitation? Do you mean that core switch like 6500 also not suitable to build a 2-tier network in term of throughput?

As always, the short answer is it depends, in this case on your access port count and bandwidth requirements.

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To YANG or Not to YANG, That’s the Question

Yannis sent me an interesting challenge after reading my short “this is how I wasted my time” update:

We are very much committed in automation and use Ansible to create configuration and provision our SP and data center network. One of our principles is that we do rely solely on data available in external resources (databases and REST endpoints), and avoid fetching information/views from the network because that would create a loop.

You can almost feel a however coming in just a few seconds, right?

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SDN Use Cases: Featured Webinar in March 2017

The featured webinar in March 2017 is the SDN Use Cases webinar describing over a dozen different real-life SDN use cases. The featured videos cover four of them: a data center fabric by Plexxi, microsegmentation (including VMware NSX), SDN-based Internet edge router built by David Barroso, and Fibbing - an OSPF-based traffic engineering developed at University of Louvain.

To view the videos, log into my.ipspace.net, select the webinar from the first page, and watch the videos marked with star.

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Worth Reading: Building an OpenStack Private Cloud

It’s uncommon to find an organization that succeeds in building a private OpenStack-based cloud. It’s extremely rare to find one that documented and published the whole process like Paddy Power Betfair did with their OpenStack Reference Architecture whitepaper.

I was delighted to see they decided to do a lot of things I was preaching for ages in blog posts, webinars, and lately in my Next Generation Data Center online course.

Highlights include:

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NETCONF Transactional Consistency on Cisco IOS XE

During the Tech Field Day Extra event at Cisco Live Europe 2017 Fabrizio Maccioni, Technical Marketing Engineer at Cisco, described enhanced programmability available in Cisco IOS XE release 16.x. What really got my attention was the claim that they made NETCONF on Cisco IOS transactional (and Fabrizio mentioned the candidate config and commit).

Here's my initial reaction:

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CloudScale ASICs on Software Gone Wild

Last year Cisco launched a new series of Nexus 9000 switches with table sizes that didn’t match any of the known merchant silicon ASICs. It was obvious they had to be using their own silicon – the CloudScale ASIC. Lukas Krattiger was kind enough to describe some of the details last November, resulting in Episode 73 of Software Gone Wild.

For even more details, watch the Cisco Nexus 9000 Architecture Cisco Live presentation.

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