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Why Do We Need BGP-LS?

One of my readers sent me this interesting question:

I understand that an SDN controller needs network topology information to build traffic engineering paths with PCE/PCEP… but why would we use BGP-LS to extract the network topology information? Why can’t we run OSPF with controller by simulating a software based OSPF instance in every area to get topology view?

There are several reasons to use BGP-LS:

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Unexpected Interactions Between OSPF and BGP

It started with an interesting question tweeted by @pilgrimdave81

I’ve seen on Cisco NX-OS that it’s preferring a (ospf->bgp) locally redistributed route over a learned EBGP route, until/unless you clear the route, then it correctly prefers the learned BGP one. Seems to be just ooo but don’t remember this being an issue?

Ignoring the “why would you get the same route over OSPF and EBGP, and why would you redistribute an alternate copy of a route you’re getting over EBGP into BGP” aspect, Peter Palúch wrote a detailed explanation of what’s going on and allowed me to copy into a blog post to make it more permanent:

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Comparing EVPN with Flood-and-Learn Fabrics

One of ipSpace.net subscribers sent me this question after watching the EVPN Technical Deep Dive webinar:

Do you have a writeup that compares and contrasts the hardware resource utilization when one uses flood-and-learn or BGP EVPN in a leaf-and-spine network?

I don’t… so let’s fix that omission. In this blog post we’ll focus on pure layer-2 forwarding (aka bridging), a follow-up blog post will describe the implications of adding EVPN IP functionality.

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Questions about BGP in the Data Center (with a Whiff of SRv6)

Henk Smit left numerous questions in a comment referring to the Rethinking BGP in the Data Center presentation by Russ White:

In Russ White’s presentation, he listed a few requirements to compare BGP, IS-IS and OSPF. Prefix distribution, filtering, TE, tagging, vendor-support, autoconfig and topology visibility. The one thing I was missing was: scalability.

I noticed the same thing. We kept hearing how BGP scales better than link-state protocols (no doubt about that) and how you couldn’t possibly build a large data center fabric with a link-state protocol… and yet this aspect wasn’t even mentioned.

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Deploying Plug-and-Pray Software in Large-Scale Networks

One of my readers sent me a sad story describing how Chromium service discovery broke a large multicast-enabled network.


The last couple of weeks found me helping a customer trying to find and resolve a very hard to find “network performance” issue. In the end it turned out to be a combination of ill conceived application nonsense and a setup with a too large blast radius/failure domain/fate sharing. The latter most probably based upon very valid decisions in the past (business needs, uniformity of configuration and management).

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OSPF Inter-Process Route Selection

The traditional wisdom claimed that a Cisco IOS router cannot compare routes between different OSPF routing processes. The only parameter to consider when comparing routes coming from different routing processes is the admin distance, and unless you change the default admin distance for one of the processes, the results will be random.

Following Vladislav’s comment to a decade-old blog post, I decided to do a quick test, and found out that code changes tend to invalidate traditional wisdom. OSPF inter-process route selection is no exception. That’s why it’s so stupid to rely on undefined behavior in your network design, memorize such trivia, test the memorization capabilities in certification labs, or read decades-old blog posts describing arcane behavior.

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ipSpace.net Subscription for System Administrators

One of our subscribers sent me this question:

I am a system administrator working primarily on server/storage virtualization. How would you recommend I take full advantage of the subscription while not being in networking full-time?

Let’s start with the webinars focused on technologies and fundamentals:

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Intricate AWS IPv6 Direct Connect Challenges

In his Where AWS IPv6 networking fails blog post, Jason Lavoie documents an intricate consequence of 2-pizza-teams not talking to one another: it’s really hard to get IPv6 in AWS VPC working with Transit Gateway and Direct Connect in large-scale multi-account environment due to the way IPv6 prefixes are propagated from VPCs to Direct Connect Gateway.

It’s one of those IPv6-only little details that you could never spot before stumbling on it in a real-life deployment… and to make it worse, it works well in IPv4 if you did proper address planning (which you can’t in IPv6).

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Unnumbered Ethernet Interfaces, DHCP Edition

Last week we explored the basics of unnumbered IPv4 Ethernet interfaces, and how you could use them to save IPv4 address space in routed access networks. I also mentioned that you could simplify the head-end router configuration if you’re using DHCP instead of per-host static routes.

Obviously you’d need a smart DHCP server/relay implementation to make this work. Simplistic local DHCP server would allocate an IP address to a client requesting one, send a response and move on. Likewise, a DHCP relay would forward a DHCP request to a remote DHCP server (adding enough information to allow the DHCP server to select the desired DHCP pool) and forward its response to the client.

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Real-Life Network-as-a-Graph Examples

After reading the Everything Is a Graph blog post, Vadim Semenov sent me a long list of real-life examples (slightly edited):


I work in a big enterprise and in order to understand a real packet path across multiple offices via routers and firewalls (when mtr or traceroute don’t work – they do not show firewalls), I made OSPF network visualization based on LSDB output. The idea is quite simple – save information about LSA1 and LSA2 (LSA5 optionally) and that will be enough in order to build a graph (use show ip ospf database router/network on Cisco devices).

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