Building network automation solutions

9 module online course

Start now!

Category: automation

Building BGP Route Reflector Configuration with Ansible/Jinja2

One of our subscribers sent me this email when trying to use ideas from Ansible for Networking Engineers webinar to build BGP route reflector configuration:

I’m currently discovering Ansible/Jinja2 and trying to create BGP route reflector configuration from Jinja2 template using Ansible playbook. As part of group_vars YAML file, I wish to list all route reflector clients IP address. When I have 50+ neighbors, the YAML file gets quite unreadable and it’s hard to see data model anymore.

Whenever you hit a roadblock like this one, you should start with the bigger picture and maybe redefine the problem.

read more add comment

The Never-Ending Story of CLI or API

Over the last weekend I almost got pulled into yet-another CLI-or-automation Twitter spat. The really sad part: I thought we were past that point. After all, I’ve been ranting about that topic for almost seven years… and yet I’m still hearing the same arguments I did in those days.

Just for the giggles I collected a few old blog posts on the topic (not that anyone evangelizing their opinions on Twitter would ever take the time to read them ;).

read more add comment

Cloud Automation Example: Create a Virtual Network

One of the first hands-on exercises in our Networking in Public Cloud Deployments asks the attendees to automate something. They can choose the cloud provider they want to work with and the automation tool they prefer… but whatever they do has to be automated.

Most solutions include a simple CloudFormation, Azure Resource Manager, or Terraform template with a line or two of README.MD, but Erik Auerswald totally astonished me with a detailed and precise writeup. Enjoy!

add comment

Automation Example: Drain a Circuit

One of the attendees of our Building Network Automation Solutions online course asked an interesting question in the course Slack team:

Has anyone wrote a playbook for putting a circuit into maintenance mode — i.e. adjusting metrics to drain traffic away from a circuit that is going to be taken down for maintenance?

As always, you have to figure out what you want to do before you can start to automating stuff.

read more add comment

Automation Story: Zero-Touch Provisioning

Zero-Touch Provisioning (ZTP) is a solved problem if you believe the networking vendors… and yet numerous network automation projects involve at least some ZTP functionality. It seems that smart organizations investing in premium people (instead of premium vendors) prefer the Unix way of solving problems: take a number of small versatile tools, and put them together to build a solution that fits your requirements.

Anne Baretta did exactly that and combined Oxidized, FreeZTP, Ansible and custom web UI to build a ZTP solution that addresses the needs of his organization.

Notes

see 1 comments

Automation Story: Network Diagrams

Anne Baretta got pretty far in his automation story: after starting with configuration templates and storing network inventory into a database, he tackled the web UI. What’s next? How about a few auto-generated network diagrams?

Notes

add comment

Automation Story: Add a Web UI

Imagine you followed the steps taken by Anne Baretta and stored network inventory into a database. What could you do with that information (apart from creating reports)? How about adding a web UI to help less-skilled network operators perform automated tasks?

Notes

  • While we won’t tell you how to build a web UI in our network automation course, we will tell you how to build a system out of numerous components (and what components you might need).
add comment

Automation Story: Building a Network Inventory Database

What’s the next logical automation step after you cleaned up device configurations and started using configuration templates? It obviously depends on your pain points; for Anne Baretta it was a network inventory database stored in SQL tables (and thus readily accessible from his other projects).

Notes

  • I’m always amazed that we have to solve simple problems decades after the glitzy slide decks from network management vendors proclaimed them solved;
  • I’m also saddened that it’s often really hard to get data out of a network management product;
  • Check out our network automation course when you’re ready to start your own automation journey.
add comment

Automation Solution: Testing Data Models

If your automation solution relies on a back-end database with strict database schema you can stop reading… but if you (like most others) still live in the land of text files encoded in your favorite presentation format (because it’s hip to hate YAML), you might appreciate the solution Donald Johnson uses to check his data models before committing them into Git repository.

Explore our Network Automation Solutions Showcase to find other solutions created by the attendees of our Building Network Automation Solutions online course.
see 2 comments

Automation Solution: Data Center Fabric with Tenant Connectivity

I always tell networking engineers attending our Building Network Automation Solutions online course to create minimalistic data models with (preferably) no redundant information. Not surprisingly, that’s a really hard task (see this article for an example) - using a simple automation tool like Ansible you end with either a messy and redundant data model or Jinja2 templates (or Ansible playbooks) full of hard-to-understand and impossible-to-maintain business logic.

Stephen Harding solved this problem the right way: his data center fabric deployment solution uses a dynamic inventory script that translates operator-friendly fabric description (data model) into template-friendly set of device variables.

read more add comment

Must Read: Ironies of Automation

Stumbled upon a 35-year-old article describing the ironies of automation (HT: The Morning Paper). Here’s a teaser…

Unfortunately automatic control can ‘camouflage’ system failure by controlling against the variable changes, so that trends do not become apparent until they are beyond control.

In simpler words: when things fail, they fail really badly because the intermittent failures were kept hidden. Keep that in mind the next time someone tells you how wonderful software-defined AI-assisted networking is going to be.

see 1 comments

Automation Solution: Data Center Fabric with Tenant Connectivity

I always tell attendees in the Building Network Automation Solutions to create minimalistic data models with (preferably) no redundant information. Not surprisingly, that’s a really hard task (see this article for an example) - using a simple automation tool like Ansible you end with either a messy and redundant data model or Jinja2 templates (or Ansible playbooks) full of hard-to-understand and impossible-to-maintain business logic.

read more add comment
Sidebar