Building Network Automation Solutions
6 week online course starting in September 2017

Teach IPv6 First and Automate the Deployment

In mid-July dr. Olivier Bonaventure (one of the unsung networking heroes who’s always trying to address real-life problems instead of inventing unicorn solutions in search of a problem) sent an email to v6ops mailing list describing how they teach networking.

Short summary for differently-attentive:

Feedback: Open Networking for Large-Scale Networks

Got this feedback from a network architect attending the Open Networking for Large-Scale Networks webinar:

I used the webinar when preparing for a meeting/discussion with a NOS SW-vendor. In the meeting, my knowledge was completely up-to-speed & I was on the level with the vendor in the discussion! :-)

Obviously, Russ White and Shawn Zandi did a great job based on their real-life hands-on experience (they use whitebox switches @ LinkedIn).

Interview with Daniel Dib

Daniel Dib is setting up a networking career (from a down-to-earth engineer’s perspective) web site, and started populating it with numerous interviews with fellow networking engineers and architects (all of them well worth reading).

Here are my answers to his questions.

RFC 8212: Bringing Sane Defaults to EBGP

It’s amazing how long it can take to get some sanity into networking technologies. RFC 8212 specifies that a BGP router should not announce prefixes over EBGP until its routing policy has been explicitly configured. It took us only 22 years to get there…

For more technical details, read this email by Job Snijders.

Net Neutrality (Again and Again and Again)

Net neutrality is one of those topics that should never have existed, but of course it inevitably erupts every so often, so here we go…

Not so long ago Robert Graham published his anti-net-neutrality arguments which are (no surprise) not much different from what I wrote when I still cared about this argument (here, here, here and here). While I agree with his overall perspective, I completely disagree with his view of Comcast’s initial response to network congestion.

RFC8200: IPv6 Is an Internet Standard

You wouldn’t believe it – after almost 22 years (yeah, it’s been that long since RFC 1883 was published), IPv6 became an Internet standard (RFC8200/STD86). No wonder some people claim IETF moves at glacial speed ;)

Speaking of IPv6, IETF and glacial speeds – there’s been a hilarious thread before Prague IETF meeting heatedly arguing whether the default WLAN SSID should be IPv6-only (+NAT64). Definitely worth reading (for the entertainment value) over a beer or two.