Cleaning the Inbox: Internet-related links

Every Internet-related post is a great opportunity to increase comment count. I’ll pass this time, here are the articles I found interesting with little or no comments from my side. First the generic Internet:

And then my favorite controversy:

3 comments:

  1. "Google IPv6 statistics – 0.2% of Google’s traffic is IPv6. Did anyone notice we’re running out of IPv4 addresses?"

    In order to access Google IPv6 it is not enough to be IPv6 capable. Google via IPv6 is only available for networks that are IPv6 only or dual-stack networks that have seperate IPv6 DNS servers and have filled out a form to request access for Google-IPv6.
    (http://www.google.com/intl/en/ipv6/)

    So even if you have a dual-stack network, and perhaps with seperate DNS servers, you won't be able to access google via ipv6 until you fill out the request form. And how many admins will go through, or know about that process?

    With this in mind, is Google IPv6 statistics relevant?

    ReplyDelete
  2. #1 - it's not the "network admin" that has to fill out the form, but the ISP admin (unless you have your own DNS and don't use the one from your ISP as a forwarder).

    #2 - Since most of the IPv6 traffic on the Internet is Google-related (more about that in an upcoming post), it's somewhat hard to fathom why an ISP would go to the pains of implementing dual-stack network and then neglect to fill in the Google form.

    #3 - even if the Google statistics are off by an order of magnitude, it's still only 2%.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Please, can you PM me and tell me number of much more thinks about this, I am truly fan of one’s webpage…gets solved properly asap.

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    ReplyDelete

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Ivan Pepelnjak, CCIE#1354, is the chief technology advisor for NIL Data Communications. He has been designing and implementing large-scale data communications networks as well as teaching and writing books about advanced technologies since 1990. See his full profile, contact him or follow @ioshints on Twitter.