Internet morons are so amazing!

A few days ago I used Google to search for an article I’d written. My article was among the top results, but there was also another web site with very similar text. I’m used to blockheads publishing content stolen from my RSS feed (which is one of the primary reasons you won’t see a full feed of my blog any time soon), but this guy seemed to be copying the whole articles ... only they sounded somewhat crazy. For example,

Yesterday I described how the IPv6 architects split the functionality of IPCP into three different protocols (IPCPv6, RA and DHCPv6). While the split undoubtedly makes sense from the academic perspective, the service providers offering PPP-based services (including DSL and retrograde uses of PPP-over-FTTH) went berserk.

... became ...

Yesterday we dеѕсrіbеd hοw thе IPv6 architects rip thе functionality οf IPCP іntο 3 odd protocols (IPCPv6, RA аnd DHCPv6). Whіlе thе rip positively mаkеѕ clarity frοm thе educational perspective, thе use providers charity PPP-based services (counting DSL аnd opposing uses οf PPP-over-FTTH) wеnt berserk.

Finally it dawned on me: someone is manually copying my text, running it through a thesaurus service (or maybe doing Google translation to Elbonian and back), probably hoping to bypass detection and/or copyright issues, and publishing it as his own. Oh, and I’m in a good company: he’s also stealing from Etherealmind, Network World, Perlmonkey and a bunch of other sites. He even has the guts to steal directly from Cisco and title his site Cisco Systems.

Usually I would just ignore a scam like this, but the results are so hilarious I simply have to share them with you. Ladies and gentlemen, here’s the most amazing moron I’ve encountered so far.

17 comments:

  1. But why link to the site, giving it more credence in Google's eyes?

    Although the site appears be run by a Romanian, the hosting company is based in the US. DMCA time. :)

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  2. Ivan Pepelnjak05 March, 2011 08:05

    Made sure to use "rel=nofollow" in the link ;)

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  3. The guy's used a 'article spinner'. Google it, you'll find loads. Very basic functionality.

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  4. Ohh my God!! This is unbelievable!

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  5. whois says the registrant is from Singapore. I haven't found any Romanian reference.

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  6. Ivan Pepelnjak05 March, 2011 15:26

    When I checked the web site's domain, it was registered to a Singaporean entity.

    Registrant:
    Men Manicure

    Raffles 24
    singapore, singapore 470701
    Singapore

    Registered through: GoDaddy.com, Inc. (http://www.godaddy.com)
    Domain Name: HUUUH.COM
    Created on: 17-Nov-07
    Expires on: 17-Nov-11
    Last Updated on: 03-Dec-10

    Administrative Contact:
    Sitors, Henry menmanicure@gmail.com
    Men Manicure
    Raffles 24
    singapore, singapore 470701
    Singapore
    +65.64587438

    Technical Contact:
    Sitors, Henry menmanicure@gmail.com
    Men Manicure
    Raffles 24
    singapore, singapore 470701
    Singapore
    +65.64587438

    Domain servers in listed order:
    NS1.HAWKHOST.COM
    NS2.HAWKHOST.COM

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  7. Domain registration spoofing is easy; you have to go deeper. http://pastebin.com/TFHn5jsx

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  8. What's strange is the reason to copy and 'spin' others content is to drive traffic and get people to click on ads on your site. This site has no ads.

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  9. Michael McNamara05 March, 2011 19:23

    That's just too wild... never heard of an 'article spinner' until today.

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  10. Reuben Farrelly05 March, 2011 23:51

    Note on the bottom of each of the pages of the site:

    ©2011 Cisco systems

    Somehow doubt that bit too...

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  11. Hahahaha http://huuuh.com/internet-morons-are-so-amazing/436
    How stupid can one be!!!

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  12. Andrew Yourtchenko06 March, 2011 11:03

    Ivan, do you remember the search query that brought you to this iceberg of wizdom in the first place ?

    If yes - then a prudent thing to do would be https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/spamreport?hl=en - to hopefully make him part with his adsense account - which will both bat in some clue and remove the economic incentive for cluelessness. (Assuming, in good faith, that the said page is not null-routed :)

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  13. laughing my ass of

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  14. I've been getting the same recently, even though my site isn't exactly a mecca for visitors yet.

    The first one I managed to get the guy to remove. The second I can't even find contact details. The main problem was that I had all kinds of lovely graphs in my post, which looked completely screwed up on the other site

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  15. Wow. Now this is funny. This_article is now up on site. Moronic is indeed the apt description.

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  16. Calin Chiorean08 March, 2011 11:16

    With new Google approach and algoritm change I hope this kind of "websites" will be soon of of top 10 searches :)

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  17. funny things

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Ivan Pepelnjak, CCIE#1354, is the chief technology advisor for NIL Data Communications. He has been designing and implementing large-scale data communications networks as well as teaching and writing books about advanced technologies since 1990. See his full profile, contact him or follow @ioshints on Twitter.