Interesting links (2010-01-30)

Links to interesting content have yet again started gathering dust in my Inbox. Time for a cleanup action. Technical content first:

Cisco Pushing More vNetwork into Hardware. Pretty good description of impact of Nexus 1000V and VN-Link on virtualized network security.

Convergence Delays: SVI vs Routed Interface. Another great article by Stretch. I never realized carrier-delay could be that harmful. The moral of the story is also important: test and verify the device behavior, don’t trust PPT slides (once I’ll share with you how I’ve learned that lesson the hard way).

RFC 6092 - Recommended Simple Security Capabilities in Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) for Providing Residential IPv6 Internet Service. A fantastic document – now we can only hope that every magazine evaluating consumer IPv6-ready CPEs starts using it as a benchmark (and that the IPv6 Ready guys pick it up).

8Gb Fibre Channel or 10Gb Ethernet w/ FCoE? The Gigabit Ethernet side of the equation is definitely wrong (10 GE has line rate above 10Gbps) and he missed the encapsulation overhead, but if the FC side is true, it makes FCoE even more compelling.

Rethinking vNetwork Security. An interesting discussion on whether it’s safe to use the same physical server by VMs belonging to different security zones.

Can you guess what the topic of one of my upcoming webinars is going to be?

And some great general purpose and management-focused articles:

Managing Nerds. If you are a team leader (or a PHB), this one is a must-read.

Supplementary Study Resources. Stretch is producing some amazing non-technical content. Couldn’t agree more.

WRITE: Why Reading Isn´t Enough. I was always saying that you have to build a mental big picture of the topics you’re studying. Here’s a method to help you get it done – write about the things you study. Writing (not tweeting) will help you get yourself organized.

19th Century Economist Reveals Surefire Investment Strategy! Extremely interesting theory (backed up with historical data): IT costs will only go up and the cloud computing won’t help us.

Cloud makes capacity planning harder. And the Earth is round. What a discovery! However, if you think that the private or public cloud will make your life easier, the article is still worth reading.

7 comments:

  1. Alexandra Stanovska30 January, 2011 13:42

    Re: once I’ll share with you how I’ve learned that lesson the hard way
    Please do. Not enough war stories, show us your scars ;)

    Re: Can you guess what the topic of one of my upcoming webinars is going to be?
    More IPv6, like implementation for ISPs in terms of connecting end users?

    ReplyDelete
  2. #1 - Will do.
    #2 - Not even close (hint: consider the position of the note in the text)

    As for "connecting end-users", it's very well covered in the existing IPv6 SP Core webinar (although I might need to make it more explicit in the description).

    ReplyDelete
  3. #1 - Will do.
    #2 - Not even close (hint: consider the position of the note in the text)

    As for "connecting IPv6 end-users", it's very well covered in the existing IPv6 SP Core webinar (although I might need to make it more explicit in the description).

    ReplyDelete
  4. Alexandra Stanovska30 January, 2011 14:54

    #2: Yes thought about that too, but maybe got influenced by omnipresent IPv6. After reading the article more than just skimming and downloading podcast (ouch for the quality) my next quess is something like securing your cloud?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thanks for the link to unifiedcomputingblog.com... if I'm missing something on the 10GE side, I'm definitely open to adjusting my figures. In fact, with a line rate over 10G, the FCoE case gets even stronger. I did account for the encapsulation overhead though...

    ReplyDelete
  6. IEEE 802.3-2008 section 4 (http://standards.ieee.org/getieee802/download/802.3-2008_section4.pdf):

    * Data rate to MAC layer is 10 Gbps (10GBASE-X or 10GBASE-R) or 9.95328 Gbps (10GBASE-W, rarely used) ... section 46.1.3
    * Encoding can be 8B/10B or 64B/66B plus numerous other things. Good overview can be found in the table in section 44.1.4.4

    ReplyDelete
  7. Interesting - I'll take a look... sounds like it may be time to consolidate my post and comments into a rewrite. In any case, with 10Gbps to the MAC layer (after encoding), it makes 10GE FCoE even better. :)

    ReplyDelete

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Ivan Pepelnjak, CCIE#1354, is the chief technology advisor for NIL Data Communications. He has been designing and implementing large-scale data communications networks as well as teaching and writing books about advanced technologies since 1990. See his full profile, contact him or follow @ioshints on Twitter.