Plans for 2013 – the easy part

You’ve probably heard all about the stupidity of setting goals or management by driving a stake in the ground. While the two contradict each other (no surprise there); it does make sense to know which way one wants to go, so here are some of my ideas for the upcoming year.

However, some great news first:

Podcast (or is it screencast)

I was publishing an occasional video every now and then during the last three years ... and it turns out it’s not that hard to make an RSS feed out of them and call it a podcast (or is it a screencast?) ... so I’m proudly presenting ipSpace.net podcast.

In this podcast you’ll get parts of my webinars (including all the contributions of the guest speakers), other short videos I did in the past, plus plenty of brand new content. Make sure you don’t miss a thing – subscribe today.

And now for the easy-to-plan ideas:

Blog posts

Nothing much will change, but you’ll probably notice more focus on network design issues that I repeatedly encounter in my ExpertExpress consulting engagements. Some of these topics will be explained with short videos; sometimes talk-and-scribble is easier than writing a lengthy blog post.

Webinar topics

Data centers, virtualization and overlay networks (with a pinch of SDN) will be the primary focus of my webinars in 2013. There will be the usual Data Center Fabrics update sessions in May and November, one or two overlay networking webinars, and a virtual firewalls and appliances webinar ... and who knows, there might be something useful to discuss on the SDN front after the ProgrammableFlow webinar (it seems NEC’s ProgrammableFlow is still the only production-grade OpenFlow solution).

Then there will be refresher/update sessions. vSphere 5.x networking update is becoming slightly overdue (planned for late spring), and I’ll start working on a total overhaul of Data Center 3.0 webinar – it might take 4-5 separate sessions to cover all the material that has accumulated in the recent years.

Finally, after describing the IPv6 transition mechanisms I’m probably done with IPv6 for the foreseeable future. There might be a refresh of the introductory webinars, or an update sessions on MAP-E and tweaks in the access networks (assuming they get adopted in the wild), but I simply don’t see another IPv6 topic worthy of an independent webinar. Am I missing something?

Guest speakers

I had fantastic experience with webinar guest speakers in 2012 (and a failure or two you don’t want to hear about), and I’ll try to attract a few guest speakers for the upcoming sessions.

If you’re interested in becoming one of them, just send me an email (you probably already know how to contact me; if not, there’s the “Contact” link at the top of the screen).

Events and conferences

This part of my regular activities has exploded. I don’t want to become one of the travelling technology minstrels, so I consider the first half of 2013 to be fully booked ... but if you have a great idea about my presentation at your event, get in touch (that’s how I ended up @ Troopers13, thanks to Enno Rey).

Autumn seems to be a bit more relaxed and I’m already looking forward to the regular events like PLNOG and EuroNOG.

Coming up next: crazier ideas ...

2 comments:

  1. "...Some of these topics will be explained with short videos; sometimes talk-and-scribble is easier than writing a lengthy blog post.... "

    If I may put in two words on this topic.

    #1) Short videos are difficult for search engines to index today. This makes it difficult for people to find your content when it may be helpful for them (that's how I found this blog years ago).

    #2) Short videos are more difficult in general to consume - they require my dedicated attention for 5-10 minutes, and worse require sound.

    That said I like videos and feel they do convey information in a different way than the written word, but don't overlook the downsides when deciding on the format!

    ReplyDelete
  2. #1 - I'm well aware of that (I tasted SEO waters a while ago) and always provide at least a short summary. BTW, the percentage of search-triggered visits is constantly decreasing (60+% last year, 50% last month), indicating that most people who are interested in what I write have already found me (or I'm drawing wrong conclusions - comment welcome).

    #2 - Not sure whether it's easier to consume a short video or an equivalent blog post. I love listening to Packet Pushers on my drive to the office and I've had feedback from numerous people asking me to provide my materials in MP4 format so they could watch it on the the train/in gym/wherever.

    How about this: if you subscribe to the podcast feed, you'll get all videos downloaded to your fruity-device-or-its-equivalent automatically, and can watch it whenever convenient.

    ReplyDelete

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Ivan Pepelnjak, CCIE#1354, is the chief technology advisor for NIL Data Communications. He has been designing and implementing large-scale data communications networks as well as teaching and writing books about advanced technologies since 1990. See his full profile, contact him or follow @ioshints on Twitter.